January 2013

Must and have (got) to

January 21, 2013

Both must and have got to can be used to talk about necessity. They are usually interchangeable; however, have got to is mainly used to talk about obligations that come from outside. On the other hand, must is mainly used to talk about the feelings and wishes of the speaker and the hearer. In American […]

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Will and going to exercise

January 20, 2013

Complete the following sentences using will or going to. In some cases, either could be used. 1. I feel awful. I think I ……………………………. fall ill. a) am going to b) will c) either could be used here 2. Tonight, I ……………………………. stay up late. I have rented a video. a) am going to b) […]

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Can and be able to

January 18, 2013

Both can and be able to can be used to talk about ability and permission. In some cases, both structures are possible. However, in some other cases only one of these two structures are used. She can knit. OR She is able to knit. He can work on a computer. OR He is able to […]

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British and American English vocabulary exercise

January 16, 2013

When it comes to vocabulary, there are very many differences between British and American English. Each sentence given below contains an italicized word. That is the keyword you have to look for. State whether the keyword is in British English or American English. 1. What is the dialling code for London? a) British English b) […]

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British and American English: differences

January 16, 2013

English has many varieties and that is hardly surprising. English is spoken in many parts of the world. Even in countries where English is not the first language, it enjoys considerable popularity. Needless to say, the English spoken in different countries are slightly different. For example, Indian English is different from British or American English […]

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Conditional forms exercise

January 13, 2013

Identify the conditional forms used in the followed sentences. 1. If you pour oil on water, it floats. a) zero conditional b) first conditional c) second conditional d) third conditional 2. She will come if you invite her. a) zero conditional b) first conditional c) second conditional d) third conditional 3. She would have helped […]

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So, too, very: grammar worksheet

January 12, 2013

Complete the following sentences using appropriate degree modifiers. Each question is followed by three suggested answers. Choose the most appropriate one. 1. The day was ……………………………….. hot that we didn’t go out. a) too b) so c) very 2. The box was …………………………….. heavy for me to lift. a) too b) so c) very 3. […]

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Common writing mistakes – part 2

January 10, 2013

UK vs. US Spelling British and American spellings are different in many ways. It doesn’t really matter which spelling you use while writing. However, you have to remain consistent throughout your writing. So for example, if you intend to use American spelling, stick to it. Do not use American spellings for some words and British […]

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Common mistakes in ESL writing – part I

January 10, 2013

English is an international language. Even in countries where it is not the first language, it is widely taught and used for administrative purposes. For example, in India English is one of the official languages. It is estimated that the number of people for whom English is the second language is much greater than the […]

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Exclamatory sentences

January 9, 2013

An exclamatory sentence is used express a sudden emotion. It could be fear, anger, anxiety, admiration, excitement etc. Here are some tips for constructing exclamatory sentences. Use what a before a singular noun. What a surprise! Before an abstract noun or a plural noun, use what without a. What awful weather! Use how before a […]

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