Expressing concession and contrast

August 14, 2013pdf

The same sentence showing concession or contrast can be expressed in several different ways.

Study the examples given below.

  • She is pretty. She is not popular with men.

The two sentences given above express contrasting ideas. We can connect them in several different ways.

Using though and although

Both though and although have the same meaning. They can both be used to connect these two clauses.

  • Although she is pretty, she is not popular with men.
  • Though she is pretty, she is not popular with men.

As and though

As and though can be used in a special structure after an adjective or adverb. In this case, they can both mean ‘although’, and suggest an emphatic contrast.

  • Pretty though she is, she is not popular with men.
  • Pretty as she is, she is not popular with men.

Using all the same and at the same time

These are discourse markers used to suggest that the second statement contrasts with the first. Note that a discourse marker does not connect two clauses. They merely show how the ideas are related. In writing, we separate the two clauses with a semicolon. A full stop is also possible.

  • She is pretty; all the same, she is not popular with men.
  • She is pretty; at the same time, she is not popular with men.

Using nonetheless, however and nevertheless

These are also discourse markers and cannot connect two clauses.

  • She is pretty; nonetheless, she is not popular with men.
  • She is pretty; however, she is not popular with men.

Using in spite of and despite

In spite of and despite are prepositions.

  • She is not popular with men in spite of being pretty.
  • She is not popular with men despite being pretty.

Note that after in spite of and despite we use a noun or an –ing form.

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