Infinitive clauses introduced by for + noun/pronoun

April 2, 2011pdf

An infinitive can have its own subject. Study the following sentences.

  • I will be happy to wash the car. (I will wash the car.)
  • I will be happy for Max to wash the car. (Max will wash the car.)
  • To wait for Peter would be a great mistake.
  • For you to wait for Peter would be a great mistake. (NOT You to wait for Peter would be a mistake.)

Note that the subject of the infinitive is the object of the preposition for. Object forms of pronouns are used after for.

  • I will be happy for them to help you. (NOT I will be happy for they to help you.)

The structure for + noun/pronoun is used after nouns, adjectives and verbs which express ideas such as wishes and other personal feelings. Examples are: anxious, eager, reluctant, delighted, willing, need, request, mistake, shame, ask, hope, wait, look, pay, arrange etc.

  • I am anxious for him to reach home in time.
  • She is eager for us to see our work.
  • It is important for the meeting to be a success.
  • It is impossible for us to finish the job in time.
  • It seems unnecessary for him to quit his job.
  • It is time for everybody to go to bed.
  • I couldn’t wait for them to finish talking.
  • We would be delighted for you to come and stay.
  • It is strange for her to be out so late.
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