Across as a preposition and an adverb

April 11, 2013pdf

Across can be used as a preposition or an adverb. When used as a preposition, it is followed by a noun.

  • We walked across the desert. (Here the noun the desert acts as the object of the preposition across.)

Across means from one side to the other.

  • She walked across the road. (= She walked from one side of the road to the other side.)

Across can be used to talk about movement from one place, space or line to the other.

  • The airplane flying across the Atlantic when it developed engine trouble.
  • They are building a bridge across the river. (= The bridge will extend from one side of the river to the other side.)

Across can also be used to show the width of something.

  • The river is only a few meters across in some places.

Across can show position. It means on the opposite side of a road, river, line etc.

  • There is a petrol pump just across the road. (= The petrol pump is on the opposite side of the road.)
  • The people across the border are moving. (= The people on the opposite side of the border are moving.)

Across can also be used to show position in many parts of an area or country.

  • They have several offices across Europe. (= They have several offices in many parts of Europe.)

Across can also be used for saying that something affects a large part of your body.

  • Suddenly he felt a sharp pain across his chest.

Across is also used for saying that something spreads until it covers the whole of a particular area.

  • A warm smile spread across her face.

When used as an adverb, across is not followed by a noun.

  • She hurried across to greet us. (Here the adverb across modifies the verb hurried.)
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