Sentence synthesis

November 15, 2011pdf

Combination of two or more simple sentences into a single compound sentence

Two or more simple sentences can be combined to form a single compound sentence by the use of coordinating conjunctions.

These are of four kinds – cumulative, adversative, alternative and illative

By using cumulative conjunctions

These conjunctions merely add one statement to another. Examples are: and, both…and, not only…but also, as well as

  • She is smart. She is intelligent.

These two simple sentences can be combined into a compound sentence.

  • She is smart and intelligent.
  • She is both smart and intelligent.
  • She is smart as well as intelligent.
  • She is not only smart but also intelligent.

More examples are given below.

  • The wind blew. The rain fell.
  • The wind blew and the rain fell.

By using adversative conjunctions

Conjunctions which express opposition or contrast between two statements are called adversative conjunctions. Examples are: still, yet, however, nevertheless

  • He is slow. He is sure.
  • He is slow but he is sure.
  • He is slow yet he is sure.
  • He is slow, however, he is sure.
  • He is slow, nevertheless, he is sure.
  • He failed. He didn’t lose hope.
  • He failed but he didn’t lose hope.
  • He failed yet he didn’t lose hope.
  • He failed; however, he didn’t lose hope.
  • He failed, nevertheless he didn’t lose hope.

 

Free Grammar Guide: "120 Deadly Grammar and Vocabulary Mistakes."