Special uses of some adverbs – Part II

August 30, 2010pdf

Too

Too is used to mean ‘more than is required’.

  • You ate too much.
  • He is too fat.
  • It is too hot to go out.
  • He is too weak to move about.
  • The news is too good to be true.

Too is often followed by to.

  • I was too tired to do any work. (= I was so tired that I could not do any work.)

Too has a negative meaning. It should not be used in the general sense of very.

  • She is very beautiful. (NOT She is too beautiful.)

Too has similar meanings to also and as well.

  • She is not only beautiful; she is also intelligent.
  • She is not only beautiful; she is intelligent as well.
  • She is not only beautiful; she is intelligent too.

Enough

Enough shows the ‘proper limit’ or ‘amount’. It is placed after the adjective or adverb it qualifies.

  • He is rich enough to buy a car.
  • She is old enough to be a grand mother.
  • He solved the problem quickly enough to pass the test.

Notes

Enough is the opposite of too.

Compare:

  • It is hot enough (= to the degree required) to go swimming. (We can go swimming.)
  • It is too hot (= more than required) to go swimming. (We can’t go swimming.)

Yes and No

If the answer is ‘yes’, the following verb must be in the affirmative.
If the answer is ‘no’, the following verb must be in the negative.

  • ‘Are you coming?”Yes, I am.’
  • ‘Are you coming?’ ‘No, I am not.’
  • ‘Is it raining?’ ‘Yes, it is.’
  • ‘Is it hot enough?’ ‘No, it isn’t.’
  • ‘Did you meet him at the conference?’ ‘Yes, I did.’
  • ‘Has he received our letter?’ ‘No, he hasn’t.’
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