Adverb clauses of comparison

October 24, 2011pdf

Adverb clauses of comparison are of two kinds:

1. Adverb clauses of comparison of degree
2. Adverb clauses of comparison of manner

Adverb clauses of comparison of degree

Adverb clauses of comparison of degree are introduced by the subordinating conjunction than, or by the relative adverb as.

  • She is older than her husband.
  • He works harder than I do.
  • It is later than I thought.
  • She earns more than her brother.
  • She is not so stupid as you think.
  • He is as stupid as he is lazy.
  • She is as beautiful as she is intelligent.

Notes

In adverb clauses of comparison of degree, the verb is usually understood and not expressed.

  • Nobody loves you more than I (do).
  • Nobody knows it better than he (does).

In an informal style, it is more common to use object pronouns after as and than. This is particularly common when the verb is not expressed.

Compare:

She earns more than I do. OR She earns more than me. (More natural than She earns more than I.)

Adverb clauses of comparison of manner

These are introduced by the relative adverb as.

  • You may do as you please.
  • It ended as I expected.
  • As you have made your bed so you must lie on it.
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