Joining two sentences using a noun clause

March 30, 2013pdf

Make one of the simple sentences the principal clause and change the other clauses into subordinate clauses. Note that the subordinate clause can be a noun clause, an adverb clause or an adjective clause.

A noun clause acts as the subject or object of a verb.

An adjective clause acts like an adjective. It is used to modify a noun or a pronoun.

An adverb clause acts like an adverb. It is used to modify a verb and express ideas such as cause, reason, time, place, frequency etc.

Method

See if one of the clauses can act like the subject or object of the verb in the other clause.

Study the example given below.

  • A good education is the best road to success in life. My parents have always believed this.

My parents have always believed – what? That a good education is the road to success in life

Here the clause ‘that a good education is the road to success in life’ can actually act as the object of the verb believed. And since it acts as the object of a verb, it is a noun clause.

  • My parents have always believed that a good education is the best road to success in life.

Another example is given below.

  • Could we depend on our guide? We didn’t know.

We didn’t know – what? If we could depend on our guide

Now make that clause the object of the verb know.

  • We didn’t know if we could depend on our guide.

Now the two sentences are combined into one using a noun clause which acts like its object.

 

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