How to join two or more simple sentences into a single complex sentence

October 19, 2010pdf

Method

Change one of the simple sentences into a principal clause and the others into subordinate clauses.

By using a noun clause
A noun clause does the work of a noun. It can act as the subject or the object of the verb in the principal clause.

  • A good education is essential for success in life. He believes this.
  • He believes that a good education is essential for success in life.
  • Could he depend on the guide? The traveler did not know.
  • The traveler did not know whether he could depend on the guide.
  • He is bent on mischief. It is known to everybody.
  • That he is bent on mischief is known to everybody.

By using an adjective clause

An adjective clause does the work of an adjective. It can modify a noun or pronoun in the main clause.

  • The slave had to fight with a hungry lion. The lion was kept in a cage.
  • The slave had to fight with a hungry lion which was kept in a cage.
  • He is a prince. Trouble had driven him from home.
  • He is a prince whom trouble had driven from home.

By using an adverb clause

An adverb clause does the work of an adverb. It can modify a verb, an adjective or another adverb in the main clause.

  • He got the first prize. He was happy.
  • He was happy when he got the first prize.
    He was happy because he got the first prize.
  • Jack fought very well. As a result of that the captain asked him to join his band of soldiers.
  • Jack fought so well that the captain asked him to join his band of soldiers.
  • He worked hard. His goal was to gain promotion.
  • He worked hard that he might gain promotion.
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