Using seem

August 28, 2012pdf

Seem is a copular verb. It is followed by adjectives, not adverbs. Seem means appear or look like.

Study the following examples.

  • I think he likes classical music.

The same idea can be expressed using seem. Two structures are possible.

  • It seems that he likes classical music.
  • He seems to like classical music.

More examples are given below.

  • I think she is excited about the offer.
  • It seems that she is excited about the offer.
  • She seems to be excited about the offer. OR She seems excited about the offer.

Seem and seem to be mean the same in most cases.

  • I think he is upset.
  • It seems that he is upset.
  • He seems to be upset.
  • People think that he is a cheat.
  • It seems that he is a cheat.
  • He seems to be a cheat.
  • I thought she was rich.
  • It seemed that she was rich.
  • She seemed to be rich.

Rewrite the following sentences using seem.

1. The police suspect that two children have gone missing.

2. I think she is busy.

3. I think that she is a strict disciplinarian.

4. The police suspect that he has a criminal background.

Answers

1. It seems that two children have gone missing. / Two children seem to have gone missing.

2. It seems that she is busy. / She seems to be busy.

3. It seems that she is a strict disciplinarian. / She seems to be a strict disciplinarian.

4. It seems that he has a criminal background. / He seems to have a criminal background.

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