Combine using a conjunction or a relative pronoun

June 5, 2014pdf

Both conjunctions and relative pronouns are used to combine two clauses.

There is a difference between them. A conjunction merely connects the two clauses. A relative pronoun also acts as the subject or object of the verb in the relative clause.

Combine the following sentences using an appropriate conjunction.

1. Her clothes caught fire. She was cooking in the kitchen.

2. His sons are employed. He has no financial worries.

3. He knows only Hindi. He does not speak any other language.

4. I invited them. They did not come.

5. The weather was bad. Still he went out.

6. Julius Caesar came to Britain in 55 BC. He was a powerful Roman General.

7. The clock struck twelve. I went to bed.

8. Napoleon died at St. Helena. The French honor him much.

9. This is the new computer. My father bought it yesterday.

10. We live in a village. It is infested with rats.

Answers

1. Her clothes caught fire while she was cooking in the kitchen.

2. Now that his sons are employed, he has no financial worries.

3. He does not know any language except Hindi.

4. Even though I invited them, they did not come.

5. Though the weather was bad, he went out.

6. Julius Caesar, who came to Britain in 55 BC, was a powerful Roman General.

7. When the clock struck twelve, I went to bed.

8. Napoleon, whom the French honor very much, died at St. Helena.

9. This is the new computer that my father bought yesterday.

10. The village where we live is infested with rats.

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