Reduced adverb clauses – Part II

August 31, 2013pdf

Reduced Adverb Clauses of Contrast

An adverb clause of contrast can be reduced to an adverbial phrase expressing the same idea.

Though she was beautiful, she wasn’t very popular.

This can be reduced to:

Despite being beautiful, she wasn’t very popular. OR In spite of being beautiful, she wasn’t very popular.

Though she was rich, she was not happy.

This can be reduced to:

Despite being rich, she was not happy.

Here is how to reduce an adverb clause.

Reducing Adverb Clauses of Time

Adverb clauses of time are usually introduced by the conjunctions before, after, since, when etc. In order to reduce an adverb clause of time introduced by one of these conjunctions, you have to keep the time word, remove the subject and then change the verb into and –ing form or a noun.

Read the examples given below.

After he finished the work, he took some rest.

This can be reduced to:

After finishing the work, he took some rest.

Note that we retained the time word, removed the subject and changed the verb into an –ing form.

Another example is given below.

Don’t forget to signal when you are turning left.

This can be reduced to:

Don’t forget to signal when turning left.

You can’t go home before you finish the work.

This can be reduced to.

You can’t go home before finishing the work.

As

The conjunction as can be used to talk about two actions or situations that go on at the same time.

Read the example given below.

As I was walking down the street, I saw Peter driving a Lamborghini.

This can be reduced to

Walking down the street, I saw Peter driving a Lamborghini.

While reducing an as-clause into a phrase, we usually remove ‘as’ and the subject + be.

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