March 2013

Joining two sentences using adjective clauses

March 31, 2013

Adjectives are words used to describe nouns. Examples are: nice, kind, beautiful, wise and hard. An adjective clause serves the same purpose as an adjective. Adjective clauses can be used to form complex sentences. As you have already learned, a complex sentence contains one main clause and one or more dependent or subordinate clauses. Study […]

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Joining two sentences using a noun clause

March 30, 2013

Make one of the simple sentences the principal clause and change the other clauses into subordinate clauses. Note that the subordinate clause can be a noun clause, an adverb clause or an adjective clause. A noun clause acts as the subject or object of a verb. An adjective clause acts like an adjective. It is […]

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Instead as an adverb and preposition

March 29, 2013

Instead is an adverb. It means ‘as an alternative’. He didn’t buy a large loaf. Instead, he bought two small loaves. She didn’t go to Greece. Instead, she went to Italy. Don’t marry Peter. Marry me instead. As an adverb instead goes at the beginning or at the end of a clause. When it goes […]

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Sentence patterns using to-infinitives

March 28, 2013

A knowledge common sentence patterns is essential to use English correctly. In a sentence, words are arranged in a particular order. This order in which words appear in a sentence is called the pattern of that sentence. There are several sentence patterns in English. If you are serious about learning English, you must have a […]

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Using relative clauses

March 27, 2013

Relative pronouns can be used to combine two clauses into one sentence. A relative pronoun acts as the subject or object of its verb. It also serves as a conjunction connecting the two clauses. Study the examples given below. The pen has been stolen. I bought it yesterday. We can combine these two sentences using […]

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Using as and like

March 25, 2013

Like is a preposition. It is used before a noun or a pronoun. She looks a bit like Elizabeth Tailor. He ran like wind. He always treated me like a sister. I haven’t seen anybody like him. She came into the hall looking like a princess. In all of these sentences like is followed by […]

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Grammar exercise

March 25, 2013

1. Which of the following sentences are grammatically correct? a) Susie applied for the job b) Susie apply for the job c) Susie will applied for the job d) Susie was applied for the job 2. Complete the following sentence with a suitable phrase. A true friend ……………………… you during hard times. a) stand by […]

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General English Exercise

March 24, 2013

This grammar exercise tests your knowledge of basic English grammar and usage. Each question is followed by four suggested answers. Choose the most appropriate one. 1. Identify the verb form from the given alternatives. a) smart           b) speak           c) sensitive      d) division 2. Fill in the blanks with a suitable word. One gets ……………………… in […]

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Using much and many

March 21, 2013

Both much and many are used to talk about an indefinite quantity or number. Note that much is used before an uncountable noun. Many is used before a countable noun. A countable noun refers to something that can be counted. Examples are: pen, book, man, flower etc. An uncountable noun refers to something that cannot […]

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Personal pronouns exercise

March 20, 2013

Fill in the blanks with suitable pronouns. 1. John and Peter are brothers. I know ………………………. very well and my father likes ………………….. very much. 2. This book has many interesting pictures and stories. I like ………………………… very much. 3. The woman gave sweets to the children, but ……………………………. did not thank …………………… 4. The […]

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